Duncan Keith Wins The Norris Trophy

The National Hockey League announced that Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith has won the 2014 James Norris Trophy, given annually to the defenseman who demonstrates the greatest all-around ability at the position.

Keith, posted 61 points (6g, 55a) in 79 games this season, tying a career-high in assists and marking the second-highest point total of his NHL career. He ranked sixth in the NHL, first among defenseman, in assists and ranked second among League blueliners in points.

The Winnipeg, Manitoba, native captured the first Norris Trophy of his career following the 2009-10 campaign after posting a career-best 69 points (14g, 55a) in 82 games with the Blackhawks.

Previous Blackhawks to win the award include Pierre Pilote (1963, 1964, 1965), Doug Wilson (1982), Chris Chelios (1993, 1996) and Keith (2010). The winner of the 2014 James Norris Trophy is selected by a poll of the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association at the end of the regular season.

2014 Keith Relief Concert With Lee Brice

Keith Relief hosted its second benefit concert on Jan. 20, 2014, at Joe's Bar on Weed Street with country music star Lee Brice! Below are a few photos from the night!

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Below is a video of Duncan and Lee meeting and promoting the concert!

Ahead of the concert, Duncan sat down and listed his Top 10 Country songs (as of 2014), take a look at them here: Duncan’s Top Country Songs.

Duncan Keith: Work Harder, Play Harder

Duncan Keith - Work Hard

The following feature appeared in the January 2013 issue of Blackhawks Magazine. Pick up the newest issue of the magazine at the next Blackhawks home game, or by calling the Blackhawks Store at (800) GO-HAWKS.

Two and a half years removed from a dream season that saw him earn Olympic gold, the Norris Trophy and the Stanley Cup, Duncan Keith, the longest-tenured Blackhawk — and resident fitness freak — has a simple plan to get himself and his team back to the pinnacle…

How does it feel to be the father figure in the locker room when you’re not even 30?

Well, I’m not the oldest guy on our team, but I guess I have been around longer than anyone else on the team. It’s happened so quickly. I still feel like I’m young, but I also feel like a veteran. I guess I feel I’m both. Somewhere in between.

When you broke into the NHL in 2005, who helped you learn the ropes with the Blackhawks?

We had a close team with a lot of character guys. Adrian Aucoin, Jim Dowd, Marty Lapointe. They showed me the way, how to be a professional. Being in the NHL is a privilege, and to stay here, you have to have discipline and know how to carry yourself. I watched them, how they went about their job. I was also fortunate to have Trent Yawney as a coach, first in Norfolk with the minor league team and then with the Blackhawks. He was very patient. I could tell that he cared and wanted to see me succeed.

And when you made mistakes as a rookie, you did so in an intimate setting, correct?

It was nothing like it is now, that’s for sure. If you didn’t suit up for an exhibition game at the United Center, you could sit in the stands and watch. Nobody would bother you. Nobody would know you. Now there aren’t any seats to sit in, which is nice.

What players did you study as a kid?

I grew up watching the Vancouver Canucks. I was born in Winnipeg, but my dad, Dave, was transferred to Ontario right away, and then we moved again to British Columbia. I always liked the guys who could really skate, like Pavel Bure. When I started playing, that was one of my greatest assets, so I sort of grew up with that mentality. If you can skate, you can have a role.

Were you always a defenseman?

No, I was a forward until I was 10 or so. My dad wanted me to be a forward. If you ask him now, he’ll probably say he still wishes I was a forward. But I liked the view from the back end. I liked the idea of getting the puck to my forwards and trying to be sort of a quarterback. I also took a lot of pride in preventing the other team from scoring, and still do.

Did your parents make the usual sacrifices for your hockey?

Absolutely. Dad was a bank manager, a hard worker. My mom, Jean, was a nurse’s aide. She would drop me off at the rink at 6 in the morning, I would show off a little for her, then she went off to work a lot of hours. They were very supportive, and I was very determined. I decided I wanted to be in the NHL at an early age, and I knew I would find a way.

Never a doubt?

Not on my part. Off the top of my head, I would say some people doubted me because of my size. I was too small. That bothered me a little bit, but that’s what’s great about sports. Everybody has opinions, and it’s best to not get too upset and do your thing.

Why Michigan State?

That was a big step for me, a fork in the road. You leave home and have a chance to develop. I liked the environment, too. Midwestern people are a lot like Canadians. Friendly, courteous, like to have fun, humble. They’re hard-working people who let their actions speak for them and don’t get too wrapped up in themselves. I see a lot of those qualities in people around Chicago, where my wife, Kelly-Rae, and I have made a lot of friends outside hockey.

You really have become part of the community in Chicago.

It’s a great place with great fans, and we consider it home. We live in British Columbia during the summer, but when we leave for the hockey season, it’s not like we’re leaving home. We’re going home, to Chicago.

Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook: Blood, Sweat and Cheers

Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook

In the final entry of the "Blood, Sweat and Cheers" series by ChicagoBlackhawks.com, former Blackhawk and current Comcast SportsNet analyst Steve Konroyd discusses the impact of top defensemen Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook.

Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook are certainly among the elite defensemen in the National Hockey League. They would be that even if they weren’t playing together, as they’ve proven on the occasions when they were split up. But the fact that they are almost always paired together is a tremendous situation for the Blackhawks and for the two of them. They’ve been together for a while, starting out as kids in the organization, and they could be together for another 10 years or so.

Click here to read the full article on Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook.

To view past Blood, Sweat and Cheers articles, please click here.

Keith Relief Partners With Ronald McDonald House Charities

Chicago Blackhawks Duncan Keith's Foundation, Keith Relief, Partners With Ronald McDonald House Charities® in Support of World's Largest House in Chicago.

OAK BROOK, Ill., PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Stanley Cup Champion, Olympic Gold Medalist and Norris Trophy winner Duncan Keith, has partnered with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana (RMHC-CNI) on behalf of their foundation, Keith Relief, to sponsor a transplant floor in RMHC-CNI's new Chicago House.

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The Keiths' partnership will benefit the new, world's largest Ronald McDonald House which is currently under construction at 211 E. Grand in Chicago's Streeterville neighborhood. Located near the new Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, the 14-story House will have 86 rooms to provide care and comfort for the families of hospitalized children each and every day of the year. Keith Relief will sponsor one of the two special transplant floors of the new House, dedicated to pediatric transplant patients and their families. With a full kitchen, as well as a refrigerator and television in each room, both floors are specifically designed to meet the needs of families whose children need to stay near the hospital post-transplant for up to three months following surgery. In addition, Keith Relief will co-brand the charity's infamous Ronald Van, which is onsite at every RMHC-CNI event and is seen extensively throughout the Chicagoland area.

Keith founded their organization in 2011 after receiving expensive medical bills following a surgical procedure. Realizing that hefty medical bills are something that many families are burdened with, the couple started their foundation in an effort to assist families and individuals suffering from medical crises. With the current economic crisis in mind, Keith Relief also aims to help those who do not have proper access to health insurance, in addition to the charitable work they do in their home away from home, Chicago.

"Ronald McDonald House Charities is such a great organization and we are proud to support their cause," said Keith. "We love Chicago, and Keith Relief has allowed us to give back to the city and people who have welcomed us with open arms."

"Everyone in Chicago has treated us so well, so we are thrilled to help out," the Keith's added. "The transplant floor at the new Ronald McDonald House will provide the comfort and care that these families so desperately need during this difficult time."

Always located in close proximity to major children's hospitals, RMHC-CNI provides a "home away from home" for families of pediatric patients being cared for in area hospitals, while also proactively reaching out to children in need with mobile medical care and educational opportunities.

"We are honored to have Duncan Keith and his foundation in partnership with us," said Doug Porter, CEO of RMHC-CNI. "We are so glad that he is using his stature in the community to help families in need, and this partnership will make a significant difference for the new Ronald McDonald House in Chicago."

The world's largest Ronald McDonald House is scheduled to open in June 2012. RMHC-CNI is committed to helping the Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana community by keeping families together when they need it most. It is with the generous support of sponsors and other charitable organizations, that they are able to make this possible.